Category Archives: Front-end Code Development

Create code solutions for meeting web site requirements and needs.

Don’t Delete OOTB SharePoint Page Layouts

For years I have told students who were creating new page layouts for their SharePoint publishing or Enterprise Wiki (in the case of SP2013) sites that they can optionally delete the default page layouts that come with the site.  I am here to officially rescind that advice! Continue reading Don’t Delete OOTB SharePoint Page Layouts

Customizing the SharePoint Online App Launcher

The waffle, the grid, the thingie in the left corner of your Suite Bar… the SharePoint Online (SPO) app launcher has many descriptions and is one of the latest changes made to SPO.  It gives the user fast access to apps and even allows you to customize what is listed and the order. It is a pretty nifty thing.  But what if you want to brand it? Or take away an option because you don’t want all of your users accessing it? Continue reading Customizing the SharePoint Online App Launcher

To brand or not to brand, that is the SharePoint Online Question

There has been quite the chatter happening on the ole’ interweb lately surrounding the topic of branding and site customization for SharePoint Online (SPO). The overall message people keep hearing is “don’t use custom master pages for SharePoint Online.” Since branding is my schtick, this makes me die a little on the inside each time I hear it. But please hear me when I say this… blanket statements are rarely applicable to everyone involved and should by no means be considered as a rule for life. Yes, you can use custom master pages with SharePoint Online. Yes, it will involve work. But there is no such thing as custom branding without work.  The issue is lack of control, and that is a scary thing to face. So let’s recap what has been happening and then I will chime in with my two cents since that is what blog posts are for anyways. Continue reading To brand or not to brand, that is the SharePoint Online Question

Missing “Apps you can add” with custom master page in SharePoint 2013

Randy Drisgill posted this little gem awhile back for SharePoint 2013, “Design Manager Bug – SharePoint 2013 RTM“, which includes info about a bug that he discovered when using a Design Manager created master page. The “Apps you can add” portion of the addanapp.aspx screen can come up missing.  The screen just ends after the Noteworthy section.  I have also discovered that this isn’t limited to just master pages generated by Design Manager, it can happen with any custom master page that you created manually or imported, etc. Continue reading Missing “Apps you can add” with custom master page in SharePoint 2013

Mega Menu for SharePoint – Part 3 of 3

The final post of a three part series, Heather Solomon and Dustin Miller are exploring the ever-popular “Mega Menu”, and how to create a powerful, styled and functional mega menu for use on your SharePoint sites. The first post explored the HTML markup and CSS needed for navigation, organized into an unordered list. The follow-up post walked through the use of navigation taxonomy and the XSL for the menu. This final piece will first show how to implement the custom view in your master page, and then enhance it further with some shiny new CSS. Continue reading Mega Menu for SharePoint – Part 3 of 3

Mega Menu for SharePoint – Part 2 of 3

This is the second part of a three part series where Heather Solomon and Dustin Miller are exploring the ever-popular “Mega Menu”, and how to create a powerful, styled and functional mega menu for use on your SharePoint sites. After creating the HTML markup and the CSS to meet the functional requirements, it is time to take a look at the importance of taxonomy in navigation and check out the XSLthat will be used for the mega menu. Continue reading Mega Menu for SharePoint – Part 2 of 3

Mega Menu for SharePoint – Part 1 of 3

In this three part series, Heather Solomon and Dustin Miller will explore the ever-popular “Mega Menu”, and how to create a powerful, styled and functional mega menu for use on your SharePoint sites. In this first part, the focus is on the HTML markup and CSS styling to used to create this oft-requested UI element.
Continue reading Mega Menu for SharePoint – Part 1 of 3

Working with the SharePoint Navigation

Yes, the SharePoint navigation really can work for your needs

A commonly misunderstood component of SharePoint is the navigation. We are frequently asked in class about how to make changes to the navigation and when we cover it, people are really surprised and honestly, it is pretty anti-climatic! Here are a few things everyone should know about manipulating SharePoint navigation. Continue reading Working with the SharePoint Navigation

Multiple Sites with Varying Designs in a Single CSS File

Multiple Sites with Varying Designs in a Single CSS File

Hi, everyone! It’s your friendly neighborhood SharePoint hacker Dustin here with a slick trick you have to try out to believe!

Recently, Heather wrote an article (Master Pages, who needs them anyways?) that talked about creating your custom designs in SharePoint using only a single Master Page. From the very first delivery of our SharePoint UI/UX Class, our students have excitedly jumped on board – it’s amazing just how much you can do with a single master page!

One student in particular spoke up: “Okay, great, one master page to rule them all. What about one CSS file? Any fancy tricks that will let me keep all my design work for all the sites and site collections in my entire farm in a single CSS file? Even those department sites that want different colors?”

It didn’t seem like too much to ask. Continue reading Multiple Sites with Varying Designs in a Single CSS File

SharePoint master pages, who needs them anyways?

SharePoint master pages, who needs them anyways?

A common misconception about SharePoint master pages is that you need several of them. In our SharePoint UI/UX class, Dustin and I meet people who have created several master pages for their SharePoint sites(s) due to branding and site layout needs. Based on design differences, a master page is created for the home page, another master page for the sub pages, and perhaps even another master page for sub site(s) that need different branding and/or layout. There are very few reasons to have more than one master page, and differing home page vs. sub page vs. sub site designs isn’t one of them. Continue reading SharePoint master pages, who needs them anyways?